CTAE Career Pathways, Course Descriptions, & Programs of Study

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W-WCHS CTAE PATHWAYS
Course Descriptions and Programs of Study

Career Pathways are state-approved career enhancement programs defined as a coherent, articulated sequence of rigorous academic and career related courses usually commencing in the ninth grade and leading to an associate degree, and/or an industry-recognized certificate or licensure, and/or a baccalaureate degree and beyond.

CTAE provides all Georgia students with the opportunity to select at least three sequenced electives in a Career Pathway, along with recommended academic coursework, to prepare them to continue their education at any level or to enter the world of work.

Selection of a Career Pathway is based on self-awareness and the investigation of occupations plus related educational levels aligned with the pathway. Students in Wilkes County can participate in five CTAE program concentrations and their related Career Pathways. Students may also participate in co-curricular Career and Technical Student Organization (CTSO) related to program areas.

1. AGRICULTURE, FOOD, AND NATURAL RESOURCES

Forestry/Wildlife Systems

     Those working in the forestry and wildlife field conserve and manage our forest and natural resources. Sample job opportunities in this field include wildlife manager, park manager, fish and game officer, forest worker, logger, forest manager and fisheries manager.

     An associate's or bachelor's degree in forestry is the minimum education recommended for a professional career in forestry. Forestry and natural resources technicians usually receive their training through a combination of community colleges and on-the-job training. Many states require licensure of professional foresters.

     Those working in this field regularly work with landowners, loggers, forestry technicians and aides, farmers, ranchers, government officials, special interest groups and the general public. Anyone interested in this field should enjoy working outdoors.

     The federal, state and local governments employ many forestry and wildlife workers. Employment of foresters is concentrated in the western and southeastern states, where many national and private forests and parks and most of the lumber and pulp-wood producing forests are located. Job opportunities are expected to be good, with the most employment opportunities in private sector consulting firms, scientific research and development services.

*Related Pathway Occupations:

Forest and Conservation Workers Foresters

Fish and Game Wardens

Forest Fire Fighting and Prevention Supervisors

Forest and Conservation Technicians

Range Managers

Science Teachers

Other Related Agriculture, Food, & Natural Resources Occupations:

Agricultural Teachers

Soil and Water Conservationists

Soil and Plant Scientists

Farm and Ranch Managers Agricultural Workers

 

Pathway courses:

  • Basic Agricultural Science – AFNR-BAS (Prerequisite) 
  • Forest Science – AFNR-FS
  • Wildlife Management – AFNR-WM

 

Basic Agricultural Science – AFNR-BAS:

This course is designed as the foundational course for all Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources Pathways. The course introduces the major areas of scientific agricultural production and research; presents problem solving lessons and introductory skills and knowledge in agricultural science and agri-related technologies. Classroom and laboratory activities are supplemented through supervised agricultural experiences and leadership programs and activities. This course is the prerequisite for all AFNR pathways and is intended for students in grades 8-10.

Forest Science – AFNR-FS:

This course provides entry-level skills for employment in the forest industry and for further study.  The course covers establishing forests by natural and artificial means, maintaining and surveying forests, identifying and protecting trees, practicing silviculture, measuring trees and land, mapping, preparing for timber sales and harvest, employing multiple-use resource management, keeping records, and figuring taxes.  Classroom and laboratory activities are supplemented through supervised agricultural experiences and leadership programs and activities.

Wildlife Management – AFNR-WM:

This course introduces students to the principles of wildlife management and conservation and to opportunities for further education and careers in the field of wildlife biology. The course includes instruction in the history of wildlife management, ecological concepts, habitat assessment, habitat management techniques for wildlife, population dynamics, predator-prey relationships, wildlife species biology and identification, human-wildlife conflict resolution, the role of hunting in conservation, game and fish laws and regulations, hunters safety, and the application of scientific principles to managing wildlife habitat and populations. Classroom and laboratory activities are supplemented through supervised agricultural experiences and leadership programs and activities.

 

Forestry and Animal Science Systems

     Animal scientists conduct research to develop better ways to produce and process meat, poultry, eggs, and milk. Much of the research focuses on the health and breeding of livestock, but domestic animals, such as cats and dogs, are also a research concern. Animal scientists are experts in genetics, nutrition, reproduction, and animal production management. Developing new characteristics to introduce into animals (such as chickens that lay more eggs) and reducing the cost of raising animals and processing animal products are other goals of workers in this pathway.

     Some animal scientists inspect and grade livestock and food products. Others develop special foods for animals, purchase livestock, or work in technical sales or marketing. Scientists may also advise producers on optimizing animal housing, handling waste matter, or lowering mortality rates of livestock and other animals. They recommend methods to improve disease control and increase the quality and quantity of animal production.

     Because most jobs in this field are research-based, a bachelor's degree in animal or agriculture science is required. A doctoral degree (Ph.D.) is necessary for leading research projects or teaching on the university level.

     The farming and food production industry spends much money on breeding, raising, and feeding animals. The industry will continue to be interested in more efficient, less costly methods of raising animals. Therefore, employment of animal scientists at research firms will be needed to study new methods and develop healthier animals.

*Related Pathway Occupations:

Agricultural Sciences Teachers

Nursery and Greenhouse Managers

Soil and Plant Scientists

Animal Scientists

Animal Breeders

Non-farm Animal Caretakers

Nursery Workers

Animal Trainers

Other Related Agriculture, Food, & Natural Resources Occupations:

First-Line Supervisors of Animal Husbandry and Animal Care Workers

Career/Technical Education Teachers

 

Pathway courses:

  • Basic Agricultural Science – AFNR-BAS (Prerequisite) 
  • Forest Science – AFNR-FS
  • Animal Science and Biotechnology – AFNR-ASB

 

Basic Agricultural Science – AFNR-BAS:

This course is designed as the foundational course for all Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources Pathways. The course introduces the major areas of scientific agricultural production and research; presents problem solving lessons and introductory skills and knowledge in agricultural science and agri-related technologies. Classroom and laboratory activities are supplemented through supervised agricultural experiences and leadership programs and activities. This course is the prerequisite for all AFNR pathways and is intended for students in grades 8-10.

Forest Science – AFNR-FS:

This course provides entry-level skills for employment in the forest industry and for further study.  The course covers establishing forests by natural and artificial means, maintaining and surveying forests, identifying and protecting trees, practicing silviculture, measuring trees and land, mapping, preparing for timber sales and harvest, employing multiple-use resource management, keeping records, and figuring taxes.  Classroom and laboratory activities are supplemented through supervised agricultural experiences and leadership programs and activities.

Animal Science and Biotechnology – AFNR-ASB:

This course is designed to introduce students to the scientific principles that underlie the breeding and husbandry of agricultural animals, and the production, processing, and distribution of agricultural animal products.  This course introduces scientific principles applied to the animal industry; covers reproduction, production technology, processing, and distribution of agricultural animal products.  Classroom and laboratory activities are supplemented through supervised agricultural experiences and leadership programs and activities.

 

Forest Mechanical Systems

     Those working in the forestry and natural resources field conserve and manage our forest and natural resources. Sample job opportunities in this field include wildlife manager, park manager, fish and game officer, forest worker, logger, forest manager and fisheries manager.

     An associate's or bachelor's degree in forestry is the minimum education recommended for a professional career in forestry. Forestry and natural resources technicians usually receive their training through a combination of community colleges and on-the-job training. Many states require licensure of professional foresters.

     Those working in this field regularly work with landowners, loggers, forestry technicians and aides, farmers, ranchers, government officials, special interest groups and the general public. Anyone interested in this field should enjoy working outdoors.

     The federal, state and local governments employ many forestry and natural resources workers. Employment of foresters is concentrated in the western and southeastern states, where many national and private forests and parks and most of the lumber and pulp-wood producing forests are located. Job opportunities are expected to be good, with the most employment opportunities in private sector consulting firms, scientific research and development services.

 

*Related Pathway Occupations:

Mechanical Engineers

Nursery and Greenhouse Manager

Nursery Workers

Control and Valve Installers and Repairers

Mechanical Engineering Technologists

Landscaping and Grounds Keeping Workers

Other Related Agriculture, Food, & Natural Resources Occupations:

Agricultural Sciences Teachers

Soil and Plant Scientists

Crop Farmworkers and Laborers

Farm and Ranch Managers

 

Pathway courses:

  • Basic Agricultural Science – AFNR-BAS (Prerequisite) 
  • Agricultural Mechanics Technology I – AFNR-AM I
  • Forest Science – AFNR-FS

 

Basic Agricultural Science – AFNR-BAS:

This course is designed as the foundational course for all Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources Pathways. The course introduces the major areas of scientific agricultural production and research; presents problem solving lessons and introductory skills and knowledge in agricultural science and agri-related technologies. Classroom and laboratory activities are supplemented through supervised agricultural experiences and leadership programs and activities. This course is the prerequisite for all AFNR pathways and is intended for students in grades 8-10.

Agricultural Mechanics Technology I – AFNR-AM I:

This laboratory course is designed to provide students with introductory level experiences in selected major areas of agricultural mechanics technology which may include wood working, agricultural structures, electrical wiring, electric arc welding, oxy/fuel cutting and welding processes, and power equipment operation and maintenance. Learning activities include information, skill development and problem solving. Classroom and laboratory activities are supplemented through FFA supervised agricultural experiences, leadership programs and activities.

Forest Science – AFNR-FS:

This course provides entry-level skills for employment in the forest industry and for further study.  The course covers establishing forests by natural and artificial means, maintaining and surveying forests, identifying and protecting trees, practicing silviculture, measuring trees and land, mapping, preparing for timber sales and harvest, employing multiple-use resource management, keeping records, and figuring taxes.  Classroom and laboratory activities are supplemented through supervised agricultural experiences and leadership programs and activities.

 

Animal and Mechanical Systems

     This pathway is a great combination for students who are interested in animal science & agriculture mechanics. A strong understanding of agriculture mechanics is necessary with all farm work, including food and animal farms. Workers in Agricultural Mechanics are responsible for the efficient operation of farm machinery. Opportunities in the farm equipment industry will grow as farms merge and grow larger. Agricultural and farm equipment mechanics are responsible for the maintenance, repair, and installation of machines that increase the efficiency of farming activities, such as planting, harvesting, and irrigating crops. Agricultural mechanics also service and repair smaller lawn and garden equipment operated by suburban homeowners.

     Students interested in animal science have many career options. Farm or ranch workers and managers are needed to ensure the production of food animal products for a growing population. Animal scientists conduct research to develop better ways to produce and process meat, poultry, eggs, and milk. Developing new characteristics to introduce into animals (such as chickens that lay more eggs) and reducing the cost of raising animals and processing animal products are other goals of workers in this pathway. Some animal scientists inspect and grade livestock and food products. Others develop special foods for animals, purchase livestock, or work in technical sales or marketing. Scientists may also advise producers on optimizing animal housing, handling waste matter, or lowering mortality rates of livestock and other animals. They recommend methods to improve disease control and increase the quality and quantity of animal production.

     The farming and food production industry spends much money on breeding, raising, and feeding animals. The industry will continue to be interested in more efficient, less costly methods of raising animals. Therefore, employment of animal scientists with agriculture mechanics skills will be needed to study new methods of more efficient farming and develop healthier animals.

*Related Pathway Occupations:

Mechanical Engineers

Control and Valve Installers & Repairers

Mechanical Engineering Technologists

Farm/ Ranch Manager Advisors

Animal Scientists

Agricultural Technician

Animal Breeders

Other Related Agriculture, Food, & Natural Resources Occupations:

Agricultural Sciences Teachers

Crop Farmworkers and Laborers

Soil/Plant Scientists

Aquacultural Managers

 

Pathway courses:

  • Basic Agricultural Science – AFNR-BAS (Prerequisite) 
  • Agricultural Mechanics Technology I – AM I
  • Agricultural Animal Production and Management – AFNR-AAPM

 

Basic Agricultural Science – AFNR-BAS:

This course is designed as the foundational course for all Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources Pathways. The course introduces the major areas of scientific agricultural production and research; presents problem solving lessons and introductory skills and knowledge in agricultural science and agri-related technologies. Classroom and laboratory activities are supplemented through supervised agricultural experiences and leadership programs and activities. This course is the prerequisite for all AFNR pathways and is intended for students in grades 8-10.

Agricultural Mechanics Technology I – AM I:

This laboratory course is designed to provide students with introductory level experiences in selected major areas of agricultural mechanics technology which may include wood working, agricultural structures, electrical wiring, electric arc welding, oxy/fuel cutting and welding processes, and power equipment operation and maintenance. Learning activities include information, skill development and problem solving. Classroom and laboratory activities are supplemented through FFA supervised agricultural experiences, leadership programs and activities.

Agricultural Animal Production and Management – AFNR-AAPM:

The goal of this course is to provide all students instruction in establishing and managing agricultural animal enterprises; includes instruction in selecting, breeding, feeding, caring for and marketing beef and dairy cattle, horses, swine, sheep, and poultry. Classroom and laboratory activities are supplemented through supervised agricultural experiences and leadership programs and activities. 

 

Animal Production and Processing

     Animal scientists conduct research to develop better ways to produce and process meat, poultry, eggs, and milk. Much of the research focuses on the health and breeding of livestock, but domestic animals, such as cats and dogs, are also a research concern. Animal scientists are experts in genetics, nutrition, reproduction, and animal production management. Developing new characteristics to introduce into animals (such as chickens that lay more eggs) and reducing the cost of raising animals and processing animal products are other goals of workers in this pathway.

     Some animal scientists inspect and grade livestock and food products. Others develop special foods for animals, purchase livestock, or work in technical sales or marketing. Scientists may also advise producers on optimizing animal housing, handling waste matter, or lowering mortality rates of livestock and other animals. They recommend methods to improve disease control and increase the quality and quantity of animal production.

     Because most jobs in this field are research-based, a bachelor's degree in animal or agriculture science is required. A doctoral degree (Ph.D.) is necessary for leading research projects or teaching on the university level.

     The farming and food production industry spends much money on breeding, raising, and feeding animals. The industry will continue to be interested in more efficient, less costly methods of raising animals. Therefore, employment of animal scientists at research firms will be needed to study new methods and develop healthier animals.

*Related Pathway Occupations:

Animal Breeders

Animal Scientists

Animal Trainers

Farmworkers

Farm and Ranch Managers

Other Related Agriculture, Food, & Natural Resources Occupations:

Agriculture Scientists Teachers

Veterinarians

Veterinary Assistants

Butchers

Meat Processing Technician

 

Pathway courses:

  • Basic Agricultural Science – AFNR-BAS (Prerequisite) 
  • Agricultural Animal Production and Management – AFNR-AAPM
  • Agriculture Meat and Dairy Product Processing – AFNR-AMD

 

Basic Agricultural Science – AFNR-BAS:

This course is designed as the foundational course for all Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources Pathways. The course introduces the major areas of scientific agricultural production and research; presents problem solving lessons and introductory skills and knowledge in agricultural science and agri-related technologies. Classroom and laboratory activities are supplemented through supervised agricultural experiences and leadership programs and activities. This course is the prerequisite for all AFNR pathways and is intended for students in grades 8-10.

Agricultural Animal Production and Management – AFNR-AAPM:

The goal of this course is to provide all students instruction in establishing and managing agricultural animal enterprises; includes instruction in selecting, breeding, feeding, caring for and marketing beef and dairy cattle, horses, swine, sheep, and poultry. Classroom and laboratory activities are supplemented through supervised agricultural experiences and leadership programs and activities. 

Agriculture Meat and Dairy Product Processing – AFNR-AMD:

This course is designed for the Food Products and Processing Pathway. The course introduces the areas of Meats (Beef, Pork, Lamb) Identification, Evaluation, Yield and Quality Grading, and Safety; Poultry (Production and Processing) Evaluation, and Management; Dairy (Production and Processing) Evaluation and Management.  The course introduces scientific agricultural production and research; presents problem solving lessons and introductory skills and knowledge in agricultural science, technologies and microbiology.  Classroom and laboratory activities are supplemented through supervised agricultural experiences and leadership programs and activities. This course is in the Food Products and Processing Pathway and is intended for students in grades 9-12.

 

Food Animal Systems

     Animal scientists conduct research to develop better ways to produce and process meat, poultry, eggs, and milk. Much of the research focuses on the health and breeding of livestock, but domestic animals, such as cats and dogs, are also a research concern. Animal scientists are experts in genetics, nutrition, reproduction, and animal production management. Developing new characteristics to introduce into animals (such as chickens that lay more eggs) and reducing the cost of raising animals and processing animal products are other goals of workers in this pathway.

     Some animal scientists inspect and grade livestock and food products. Others develop special foods for animals, purchase livestock, or work in technical sales or marketing. Scientists may also advise producers on optimizing animal housing, handling waste matter, or lowering mortality rates of livestock and other animals. They recommend methods to improve disease control and increase the quality and quantity of animal production.

     Because most jobs in this field are research-based, a bachelor's degree in animal or agriculture science is required. A doctoral degree (Ph.D.) is necessary for leading research projects or teaching on the university level.

     The farming and food production industry spends much money on breeding, raising, and feeding animals. The industry will continue to be interested in more efficient, less costly methods of raising animals. Therefore, employment of animal scientists at research firms will be needed to study new methods and develop healthier animals.

*Related Pathway Occupations:

Meat, Poultry, Fish Cutters and Trimmers

Biologists

Zoologists

Animal Breeders

Veterinarians

Farmworkers

Other Related Agriculture, Food, & Natural Resources Occupations:

Veterinary Assistants and Laboratory Animal Caretakers

Animal Control Workers

Agricultural Teachers

Science Teachers

Aquacultural Animal Caretakers

Non-Farm Animal Caretakers

 

Pathway courses:

  • Basic Agricultural Science – AFNR-BAS (Prerequisite) 
  • Animal Science and Biotechnology – AFNR-ASB
  • Agricultural Animal Production and Management – AFNR-AAPM

 

Basic Agricultural Science – AFNR-BAS:

This course is designed as the foundational course for all Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources Pathways. The course introduces the major areas of scientific agricultural production and research; presents problem solving lessons and introductory skills and knowledge in agricultural science and agri-related technologies. Classroom and laboratory activities are supplemented through supervised agricultural experiences and leadership programs and activities. This course is the prerequisite for all AFNR pathways and is intended for students in grades 8-10.

Animal Science and Biotechnology – AFNR-ASB:

This course is designed to introduce students to the scientific principles that underlie the breeding and husbandry of agricultural animals, and the production, processing, and distribution of agricultural animal products.  This course introduces scientific principles applied to the animal industry; covers reproduction, production technology, processing, and distribution of agricultural animal products.  Classroom and laboratory activities are supplemented through supervised agricultural experiences and leadership programs and activities.

Agricultural Animal Production and Management – AFNR-AAPM:

The goal of this course is to provide all students instruction in establishing and managing agricultural animal enterprises; includes instruction in selecting, breeding, feeding, caring for and marketing beef and dairy cattle, horses, swine, sheep, and poultry. Classroom and laboratory activities are supplemented through supervised agricultural experiences and leadership programs and activities. 

 

Agriculture Mechanics and Electrical Systems

     Workers in the Agricultural Mechanics and Electrical Systems pathway install, connect, test, and maintain electrical systems for a variety of purposes including climate control, security, and communications. They also install and maintain the electronic controls for machines in business and industry. Although most electricians specialize in construction or maintenance, a growing number do both.

     Electricians work with blueprints when they install electrical systems in factories, office buildings, homes, and other structures. Blueprints indicate the locations of circuits, outlets, load centers, panel boards, and other equipment. Electricians must follow the National Electric Code and comply with state and local building codes when they install these systems.

     Maintenance work varies greatly, depending on where the electrician is employed. Electricians who specialize in residential work may rewire a home and replace an old fuse box with a new circuit breaker box to accommodate additional appliances. Those who work in large factories may repair motors, transformers, generators, and electronic controllers on machine tools and industrial robots. Those in office buildings and small plants may repair all types of electrical equipment.

     Some electricians receive formal training in professional/ technical schools and two-year colleges, where they learn the basics of electrical wiring. Electricians also learn and develop their skills on the job, receiving training from more experienced electricians. Licensing examinations are required in most states. Competition for workers is keen because of the scarcity of qualified people to fill electrician positions.

*Related Pathway Occupations:

Electrical Engineering Technicians

Electrical Engineers

Electricians

Electrical Power-Line Installers and Repairers

Electrical Engineering Technologists Electrical Drafters

Power Plant Operators

Other Related Agriculture, Food, & Natural Resources Occupations:

Electric Motor, Power Tool, and Related Repairers

Construction and Building Inspectors

Home Appliance Repairers

 

Pathway courses:

  • Basic Agricultural Science – AFNR-BAS (Prerequisite) 
  • Agricultural Mechanics Technology I – AFNR-AM I
  • Agriculture Electricity and Electric Controls – AFNR-AEEC

 

Basic Agricultural Science – AFNR-BAS:

This course is designed as the foundational course for all Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources Pathways. The course introduces the major areas of scientific agricultural production and research; presents problem solving lessons and introductory skills and knowledge in agricultural science and agri-related technologies. Classroom and laboratory activities are supplemented through supervised agricultural experiences and leadership programs and activities. This course is the prerequisite for all AFNR pathways and is intended for students in grades 8-10.

Agricultural Mechanics Technology I – AFNR-AM I:

This laboratory course is designed to provide students with introductory level experiences in selected major areas of agricultural mechanics technology which may include wood working, agricultural structures, electrical wiring, electric arc welding, oxy/fuel cutting and welding processes, and power equipment operation and maintenance. Learning activities include information, skill development and problem solving. Classroom and laboratory activities are supplemented through FFA supervised agricultural experiences, leadership programs and activities.

Agriculture Electricity and Electric Controls – AFNR-AEEC:

This laboratory course is designed to provide students with introductory level experiences in selected major areas of agricultural mechanics technology associated with the design and installation of electric motor and non-motor load electrical circuits designed for use in agricultural structures, and agricultural industry applications. Topics covered include electrical terms and theory, branch and feeder circuit design and installation, service entrance equipment selection and installation, electric motors and motor controllers, switching devices including thermostats, proximity sensors, float switches, clock timers, relays, and similar devices. Learning activities include information, skill development and problem solving. Classroom and laboratory activities are supplemented through supervised agricultural experiences and leadership programs and activities.

 

Agricultural Mechanics and Metal Fabrication

     Workers in the Agricultural Mechanics Metal Fabrication pathway create structures by manipulating metal. Agricultural and farm equipment is often created by metal fabrication.

     Important skills for this pathway include the ability to create and follow a detailed plan, the ability to understand the needs of others, and a keen eye for detail and functionality.

     Some Agricultural Metal Fabricators repair or design agricultural machinery components and equipment using computer-aided (CAD) technology. They also design food processing plants and related mechanical systems. Some metal fabricators receive formal training in professional/technical schools and two-year colleges, where they learn the basics of welding and making patterns. Other metal fabricators learn their skills on the job, receiving training from more experienced mechanics and from formal apprenticeships.

   Welders and solderers use heat to permanently join pieces of metal. Because of its strength, welding is important to the manufacture of ships, automobiles, and aircraft. In addition, welders work in the construction industry, joining beams in buildings and other structures. Solderers use similar processes on electronic and other small equipment. The outlook for welders and solderers varies by industry.

   Workers are required to complete extensive on‐the‐job‐training, apprenticeships, and/or technical college programs.

   Employment of welders, cutters, solderers, and brazers is expected to grow 15 percent from 2010 to 2020, about as fast as the average for all occupations. This employment growth reflects the need for welders in manufacturing because of the importance of welding as part of the manufacturing process. Welders can easily move from one industry to another because basic welding skills are the same across industries. Welders who work in the automotive manufacturing industry can find work in the oil and gas industry. Growth in the defense industry as well as the need to rebuild bridges, highways and aging building will contribute to employment growth.

   Overall job prospects will vary by skill level. Job prospects should be good for welders trained in the latest technologies. Welding schools report that graduates have little difficulty finding work, but many welding employers report difficulty finding properly skilled welders. However, welders who do not have up‐to‐date training may face competition for jobs. For all welders, job prospects should be better for those willing to relocate.

*Related Pathway Occupations:

Agricultural Engineers

Welders

Sheet Metal Workers

Patternmakers

Structural Metal Fabricators and Fitters

Layout Workers

Precious Metal Workers

Other Related Agriculture, Food, & Natural Resources Occupations:

Agricultural Science Teachers

Agricultural Equipment Operator

Pourers and Casters

Model Makers

Mechanics

 

Pathway courses:

  • Basic Agricultural Science – AFNR-BAS (Prerequisite) 
  • Agricultural Mechanics Technology I – AFNR-AM I
  • Agricultural Metals Fabrication – AFNR-AMF

 

Basic Agricultural Science – AFNR-BAS:

This course is designed as the foundational course for all Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources Pathways. The course introduces the major areas of scientific agricultural production and research; presents problem solving lessons and introductory skills and knowledge in agricultural science and agri-related technologies. Classroom and laboratory activities are supplemented through supervised agricultural experiences and leadership programs and activities. This course is the prerequisite for all AFNR pathways and is intended for students in grades 8-10.

Agricultural Mechanics Technology I – AFNR-AM I:

This laboratory course is designed to provide students with introductory level experiences in selected major areas of agricultural mechanics technology which may include wood working, agricultural structures, electrical wiring, electric arc welding, oxy/fuel cutting and welding processes, and power equipment operation and maintenance. Learning activities include information, skill development and problem solving. Classroom and laboratory activities are supplemented through FFA supervised agricultural experiences, leadership programs and activities.

Agricultural Metals Fabrication – AFNR-AMF:

This course is designed to provide students with a more in-depth study of agricultural metal fabrication.  Students interested in agricultural mechanics will have the opportunity to explore the many career possibilities in the field of agricultural metal fabrication.  Additionally, hands-on-laboratory activities enhance the classroom learning experience and provide students with the skills needed to participate in Supervised Agricultural Experience Programs and FFA Career Development Events.  

 

Agriculture Mechanics Systems

     Because workers in the Agricultural Mechanics pathway are responsible for the efficient operation of farm machinery, opportunities in the farm equipment industry will grow as farms merge and grow larger. Agricultural and farm equipment mechanics are responsible for the maintenance, repair, and installation of machines that increase the efficiency of farming activities, such as planting, harvesting, and irrigating crops. Agricultural mechanics also service and repair smaller lawn a11d garden equipment operated by suburban homeowners.

     Important skills for this pathway include the ability to maintain and repair farm machines, such as large tractors or combines. Dairy equipment repairers maintain and repair milking machines and other equipment used by dairy farmers. Modern farm equipment utilizes computers, electronics, and hydraulics, which means that workers need to continually update their skills. In fact, what was once a general repairer's job has become a more specialized technical field in the farm industry. As a result, many farmers rely on farm equipment dealers to maintain and repair their machinery because the equipment is more complex than in the past. Another occupation in this pathway is agricultural engineer-someone who designs equipment and technology to meet farmer needs.

     Some agricultural mechanics receive formal training in professional/technical schools and two-year colleges, where they learn the basics of diesel engines, transmissions, and hydraulics. Other mechanics learn their skills on the job, receiving training from more experienced mechanics and from training sessions conducted by heavy equipment manufacturers. Competition for workers is keen because of the scarcity of qualified people to fill agricultural mechanic positions.

*Related Pathway Occupations:

Agricultural Inspectors

Agricultural Science Postsecondary Teachers

Agricultural Technicians

Aquacultural Managers

Butchers & Meat Cutters

Buyers & Purchasing Agents

Chemical Technicians

Agricultural Engineers

Other Related Agriculture, Food, & Natural Resources Occupations:

Farm & Ranch Managers

Food Cooking Machine Operators

Graders & Sorters

Slaughters & Meat Packers

 

Pathway courses:

  • Basic Agricultural Science – AFNR-BAS (Prerequisite) 
  • Agricultural Mechanics Technology I – AFNR-AM I
  • Agricultural Mechanics Technology II – AFNR-AM II

 

Basic Agricultural Science – AFNR-BAS:

This course is designed as the foundational course for all Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources Pathways. The course introduces the major areas of scientific agricultural production and research; presents problem solving lessons and introductory skills and knowledge in agricultural science and agri-related technologies. Classroom and laboratory activities are supplemented through supervised agricultural experiences and leadership programs and activities. This course is the prerequisite for all AFNR pathways and is intended for students in grades 8-10.

Agricultural Mechanics Technology I – AFNR-AM I:

This laboratory course is designed to provide students with introductory level experiences in selected major areas of agricultural mechanics technology which may include wood working, agricultural structures, electrical wiring, electric arc welding, oxy/fuel cutting and welding processes, and power equipment operation and maintenance. Learning activities include information, skill development and problem solving. Classroom and laboratory activities are supplemented through FFA supervised agricultural experiences, leadership programs and activities.

Agricultural Mechanics Technology II – AFNR-AM II:

The goal of this laboratory course is designed to offer students intermediate level experiences in selected major areas of agricultural mechanics technology which may include small engine maintenance and repair, metal fabrication, concrete construction, building construction, plumbing, electrical wiring, maintenance of agricultural machinery, equipment and tractors and soil and water conservation. Learning activities include information, skill development and problem solving.

 

Agriculture Mechanics Systems Program of Study:

http://www.gadoe.org/Curriculum-Instruction-and-Assessment/CTAE/Documents/AFNR-Agricultural-Mechanics-Systems-POS.pdf 

 

 

2. BUSINESS, MANAGEMENT, & ADMINISTRATION

Business and Technology

     Career opportunities in every sector of the economy include technical and business skills learned within this pathway. A strong foundation of business concepts integrated with technology skills used in business will prepare workers for every occupation. Specific relevant careers include the support service industry, which is one of the largest job providers in the US economy. Support service positions include tasks such as managing projects, scheduling, planning, organizing, directing and evaluating business functions essential to efficient and productive business operations. As technology continues to advance, support service workers will increasingly assume the role of information and communication managers.

     Education and training for jobs in this pathway range from high school career and technical career programs to one- and two-year programs. Written, oral and verbal communication skills, flexibility, personal presentation, leadership, time management and teamwork are all skills vital to this career area.

     Students completing the Business and Technology pathway have the opportunity to earn industry-recognized Microsoft Office Specialist certifications in Word, Excel, Access, and PowerPoint. 

*Related Pathway Occupations:

Administrative Services Managers

Computer Operators

Database Administrators

Word Processor & Typists

Management Analysts

Stock Clerks

Legal Secretaries

Medical Secretaries

Other Related Business Management & Administration Occupations:

Shipping & Receiving Clerks

Budget Analysts

Office Machine Operators

Computer & Information Systems Managers

 

Pathway courses:

  • Introduction to Business and Technology – BMA-IBT (Prerequisite) 
  • Business and Technology – BMA-BT
  • Business Communications – BMA-BC

 

Introduction to Business and Technology – BMA-IBT:

Introduction to Business & Technology is the foundational course for Business and Technology, Entrepreneurship, and Human Resources Management pathways. The course is designed for high school students as a gateway to the career pathways above, and provides an overview of business and technology skills required for today's business environment. Knowledge of business principles, the impact of financial decisions, and technology proficiencies demanded by business combine to establish the elements of this course. Emphasis is placed on developing proficient fundamental computer skills required for all career pathways. Students will learn essentials for working in a business environment, managing a business, and owning a business. The intention of this course is to prepare students to be successful both personally and professionally in an information-based society. Students will not only understand the concepts, but apply their knowledge to situations and defend their actions/decisions/choices through the knowledge and skills acquired in this course. Employability skills are integrated into activities, tasks, and projects throughout the course standards to demonstrate the skills required by business and industry. Competencies in the co-curricular student organization, Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA), are integral components of both the employability skills standards and content standards for this course. 

Various forms of technologies will be highlighted to expose students to the emerging technologies impacting the business world. Professional communication skills and practices, problem-solving, ethical and legal issues, and the impact of effective presentation skills are taught in this course as a foundational knowledge to prepare students to be college and career ready. Introduction to Business & Technology is a course that is appropriate for all high school students. After mastery of the standards in this course, students should be prepared to earn an industry recognized credential: Microsoft Office Specialist for Word Core Certification. The prerequisite for this course is advisor approval.

Business and Technology – BMA-BT:

How is technology used to solve business problems and communicate solutions? Business and Technology is designed to prepare students with the knowledge and skills to be an asset to the collaborative, global, and innovative business world of today and tomorrow. Mastery use of spreadsheets and the ability to apply leadership skills to make informed business decisions will be a highlight of this course for students. Publishing industry appropriate documents to model effective communication and leadership will be demonstrated through project based learning. Students will use spreadsheet and database software to manage data while analyzing, organizing and sharing data through visually appealing presentation. 

Various forms of technologies will be used to expose students to resources, software, and applications of business practices.  Professional communication skills and practices, problem-solving, ethical and legal issues, and the impact of effective presentation skills are enhanced in this course to prepare students to be college and career ready. Employability skills are integrated into activities, tasks, and projects throughout the course standards to demonstrate the skills required by business and industry. Competencies in the co-curricular student organization, Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA), are integral components of the employability skills standard for this course.

Business and Technology is the second course in the Business and Technology pathway in the Business Management and Administration cluster. Students enrolled in this course should have successfully completed Introduction to Business and Technology.

Business Communications – BMA-BC:

What message are you sending when you speak, write, and listen? As one of the most important skills for employers, students will explore the value of communication in their personal and professional life. The digital presence and impact of written and visual communication in a technological society will be addressed. Students will create, edit, and publish professional-appearing business documents with clear and concise communication. Creative design, persuasive personal and professional communications will be applied through research, evaluation, validation, written, and oral communication. Leadership development and teamwork skills will be stressed as students work independently and collaboratively. Presentation skills will be developed and modeled for students master presentation software in this course.

Various forms of technologies will be used to expose students to resources, software, and applications of communications. Professional communication skills and practices, problem-solving, ethical and legal issues, and the impact of effective presentation skills are enhanced in this course to prepare students to be college and career ready. Employability skills are integrated into activities, tasks, and projects throughout the course standards to demonstrate the skills required by business and industry. Competencies in the co-curricular student organization, Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA), are integral components of the employability skills standard for this course.

Business Communications is the third course in the Business and Technology pathway in the Business Management and Administration cluster. Students enrolled in this course should have successfully completed Introduction to Business and Technology and Business and Technology. After mastery of the standards in this course, students should be prepared to take the end of pathway assessment in this career area.

 

Business and Technology Program of Study:

http://www.gadoe.org/Curriculum-Instruction-and-Assessment/CTAE/Documents/Business-Management-Admin-Business-Technology-POS.pdf

 

Entrepreneurship

     Entrepreneurs, innovators, proprietors, and small business owners play a key role in Georgia's economy. According to the United States Small Business Administration, there are 907,068 small businesses in Georgia (http://www.sba.gov/ ). Small business owners manage their own companies.

     Job opportunities in business are varied and educational requirements vary according to specialization. Business professionals may be managers, owners, accountants, economists, administrators, or analysts. Those considering a career in business, especially entrepreneurs, should be analytical, detail-oriented, flexible, and decisive. They will be required to coordinate several activities at once, quickly analyze and solve specific problems, and cope with deadlines. Business professionals should also have good communication skills and be able to establish working relationships with many different people, from managers, supervisors and other professionals to clerks and related workers.

     There are basically three types of small businesses: sole proprietorship, partnerships, and corporations. Marketing skills are critical to a small business owner. It is important for owners to know when to take a risk, adapt to the changing market conditions, improve services, promote their goods or services and hire new employees. As with any other business, owners must be competitive while keeping costs down.

     Owners who employ other workers must hire, train, and supervise their employees. Some run the entire business themselves.

 

Since there are not specific occupations representing this pathway, the following are resources for small business developers:

  • FIRST STOP- www.sos.qeorqia.gov/firststop
  • Georgia Entrepreneur & Small Business Programs -www.georgia.org/smallbusiness
  • SCORE provides free, one-on-one counseling to potential entrepreneurs and mentoring to those who decide to start their own business. www.score.org.
  • Georgia Trends Small Business Guide--http://www.madisoncountyga.org/Smal/BusinessGuide2012-13.pdf

 

Pathway courses:

  • Introduction to Business and Technology – BMA-IBT (Prerequisite) 
  • Legal Environment of Business – BMA-LEB
  • Entrepreneurship – BMA-ENT

 

Introduction to Business and Technology – BMA-IBT:

Introduction to Business & Technology is the foundational course for Business and Technology, Entrepreneurship, and Human Resources Management pathways. The course is designed for high school students as a gateway to the career pathways above, and provides an overview of business and technology skills required for today's business environment. Knowledge of business principles, the impact of financial decisions, and technology proficiencies demanded by business combine to establish the elements of this course. Emphasis is placed on developing proficient fundamental computer skills required for all career pathways. Students will learn essentials for working in a business environment, managing a business, and owning a business. The intention of this course is to prepare students to be successful both personally and professionally in an information-based society. Students will not only understand the concepts, but apply their knowledge to situations and defend their actions/decisions/choices through the knowledge and skills acquired in this course. Employability skills are integrated into activities, tasks, and projects throughout the course standards to demonstrate the skills required by business and industry. Competencies in the co-curricular student organization, Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA), are integral components of both the employability skills standards and content standards for this course. 

Various forms of technologies will be highlighted to expose students to the emerging technologies impacting the business world. Professional communication skills and practices, problem-solving, ethical and legal issues, and the impact of effective presentation skills are taught in this course as a foundational knowledge to prepare students to be college and career ready. Introduction to Business & Technology is a course that is appropriate for all high school students. After mastery of the standards in this course, students should be prepared to earn an industry recognized credential: Microsoft Office Specialist for Word Core Certification. The prerequisite for this course is advisor approval.

Legal Environment of Business – BMA-LEB:

Legal Environment of Business addresses statutes and regulations affecting businesses, families, and individuals. All students will benefit with the knowledge of business law as they will eventually assume roles as citizens, workers, and consumers in their communities and in society at large. 

Students will get an overview of business law while concentrating on the legal aspects of business ownership and management. Legal issues addressed include court procedures, contracts, torts, consumer law, employment law, environmental law, international law, ethics, and the role of the government in business.  Students will not only understand the concepts, but will also apply their knowledge to situations and defend their actions, decisions, and choices.  

Various forms of technologies will be highlighted to expose students to the emerging technologies impacting the business world. Professional communication skills and practices, problem-solving, ethical and legal issues, and the impact of effective presentation skills are expanded in this course to prepare students to be college and career ready. Employability skills are integrated into activities, tasks, and projects throughout this course to demonstrate skills required by business and industry.  Competencies in the co-curricular student organization, Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA), are integral components of both the employability skills and content standards of this course.

Legal Environment of Business is the second course in the Entrepreneurship and Human Resources Management pathway in the Business Management & Administration Cluster. Students enrolled in this course should have successfully completed the first course in the pathway Introduction to Business & Technology.

Entrepreneurship – BMA-ENT:

How do you turn an idea into a business? Experience just that in this course! Entrepreneurship focuses on recognizing a business opportunity, starting a business, operating and maintaining a business. Students will be exposed to the development of critical thinking, problem solving, and innovation in this course as they will either be the business owner or individuals working in a competitive job market in the future. Integration of accounting, finance, marketing, business management, legal and economic environments will be developed throughout projects in this course. Working to develop a business plan that includes structuring the organization, financing the organization, and managing information, operations, marketing, and human resources will be a focus in the course. Engaging students in the creation and management of a business and the challenges of being a small business owner will be fulfilled in this course. 

Various forms of technologies will be used to expose students to resources and application of business principles for starting, operating and maintaining a business.  Professional communication skills and practices, problem-solving, ethical and legal issues, and the impact of effective presentation skills are enhanced in this course to prepare students to be college and career ready. Employability skills are integrated into activities, tasks, and projects throughout the course standards to demonstrate the skills required by business and industry. Competencies in the co-curricular student organization, Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA), are integral components of the employability skills standard for this course.

Entrepreneurship is the third course in the pathway in the Business Management & Administration Cluster. Students enrolled in this course should have successfully completed Introduction to Business & Technology and Legal Environment of Business. After mastery of the standards in this course, students should be prepared to take the end of pathway assessment in this career area.

 

Entrepreneurship Program of Study:

http://www.gadoe.org/Curriculum-Instruction-and-Assessment/CTAE/Documents/Business-Management-Admin-Entrepreneurship-POS.pdf

 

3. INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

Computer Science

     Careers in Computer Science lead individuals to create, modify, and test codes; all while inventing and designing new approaches to computing technology and finding innovative uses for existing technology. Career area focus requires solving complex problems in computing for business, medicine, science, and other fields.

     To work as a computer programmer, one must have a bachelor's degree, generally in computer science, mathematics, or information systems. Some computer programmers take coursework in computer science while earning their degrees in accounting, finance and business. Some of those working as computer programmers earn an associate's degree or certificate.

     Programming skills and experience are highly valued in this field, particularly knowledge of object-oriented languages and tools. In addition, working computer programmers must constantly update their skills to keep up with changing technology. Specialized knowledge and experience with a language or operating system can lead to a computer programmer becoming a computer software engineer.

     Employment of computer programmers is expected to increase 12 percent from 2010 to 2020, about as fast as the average for all occupations. The advances in computer technology require programmers to constantly look for more effective and efficient processes to expedite their ability to spend more time writing new programs.

Programming including Game Design 

     A computer programmer creates the code for software applications and operating systems. After a software developer or computer software engineer designs a computer program, the programmer writes code that converts that design into a set of instructions a computer can follow. Programmers test the program to look for errors and then rewrite it until it is debugged, or error‐free. A programmer continues to evaluate programs that are in use, making updates and adjustments as needed. The application of programming is applied through game design. A video game designer will come up with a concept that will eventually become a video game and see that idea through to fruition. They will work with other members of the development team, including artists, programmers and audio engineers. Video game design jobs are not entry‐level positions — one will have to work up to this position by working in other jobs in the field. Video game design jobs include game designer, lead designer and level designer. A video game job is possible, but a job working as a video game designer is usually earned from years of experience doing other work in this field. Fortunately there are many types of jobs from which to choose, both on the technical side and on the business side of the industry.

     The information technology industry, including programming, is a dynamic and entrepreneurial field that continues to have a revolutionary impact on the economy and on the world. Students in information technology learn and practice skills that prepare them for diverse post‐ high school education and training opportunities, from apprenticeships and two‐year college programs to four‐year college and graduate programs.

*Related Pathway Occupations:

Software Engineers

Computer Programmers

Computer & Information Systems Managers

Computer Hardware Engineers

Computer Network Architects

Computer System Analysts

Database Administrators

Other Related Information Technology Occupations:

Information Security Analysts

Network & Computer Systems Administrators

Video Game Designers

Game Designers

 

Pathway courses: (sequential)

  1. Introduction to Digital Technology
  2. Computer Science Principles – IT-CSP or AP Computer Science Principles – IT-APCSP

3. Depending on the pathway students want to complete, they have a choice of the third course. These courses are offered via the Georgia Virtual School platform.

  • Computer Science = Course: AP Computer Science – IT-APCS 
  • Game Design = Course: Game Design: Animation and Simulation
  • Programming = Course: Programming, Games, Apps, and Society

 

Introduction to Digital Technology – IT-IDT

Introduction to Digital Technology is the foundational course for Web & Digital Communications, Programming, Advanced Programming, Information Support & Services, and Network Systems pathways. This course is designed for high school students to understand, communicate, and adapt to a digital world as it impacts their personal life, society, and the business world. Exposure to foundational knowledge in hardware, software, programming, web design, IT support, and networks are all taught in a computer lab with hands-on activities and project-focused tasks. Students will not only understand the concepts, but apply their knowledge to situations and defend their actions/decisions/choices through the knowledge and skills acquired in this course. Employability skills are integrated into activities, tasks, and projects throughout the course standards to demonstrate the skills required by business and industry. Competencies in the co-curricular student organization, Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA), are integral components of both the employability skills standards and content standards for this course. Various forms of technologies will be highlighted to expose students to the emerging technologies impacting the digital world. Professional communication skills and practices, problem-solving, ethical and legal issues, and the impact of effective presentation skills are taught in this course as a foundational knowledge to prepare students to be college and career ready. The knowledge and skills taught in this course build upon each other to form a comprehensive introduction to digital world.

Introduction to Digital Technology is a course that is appropriate for all high school students. The pre-requisite for this course is advisor approval.

Computer Science Principles – IT-CSP

How can computing change the world? What is computer science? Engage your creativity, demonstrate and build your problem solving ability all while connecting the relevance of computer science to the society! Computer Science (CS) Principles is an intellectually rich and engaging course that is focused on building a solid understanding and foundation in computer science. This course emphasizes the content, practices, thinking and skills central to the discipline of computer science. Through both its content and pedagogy, this course aims to appeal to a broad audience. The focus of this course will fall into these computational thinking practices: connecting computing, developing computational artifacts, abstracting, analyzing problems and artifacts, communicating, and collaborating.

Various forms of technologies will be used to expose students to resources and application of computer science. Professional communication skills and practices, problem-solving, ethical and legal issues, and the impact of effective presentation skills are enhanced in this course to prepare students to be college and career ready. Employability skills are integrated into activities, tasks, and projects throughout the course standards to demonstrate the skills required by business and industry.

Computer Science Principles is the second course in the pathways Programming and Computer Science in the Information Technology Cluster. Students enrolled in this course should have successfully completed Introduction to Digital Technology.

Computer Science Program of Study:

http://www.gadoe.org/Curriculum-Instruction-and-Assessment/CTAE/Documents/POS-Information-Technology-Computer-Science.pdf

AP Computer Science – IT-APCS (*Georgia Virtual School course)

The purpose of AP Computer Science is to lay the foundation for object-oriented programming. The course aims at teaching the students computer science concepts. Java is used as the vehicle to teach them. The focus is more on the concepts and abstract ideas rather than on the syntax. The course is about design of classes, algorithms, programming techniques and introduction to data structures like arrays and array lists. Students will spend 2 to 3 days a week reading the textbook and the rest of the week working on the lab. It is expected that students will have to work outside of the classroom provided time by way of homework.

AP Computer Science meets fourth science or fourth mathematics or world language requirement; Two computer science courses from the same pathway will satisfy two years of sequenced foreign language courses.

Programming Program of Study:

http://www.gadoe.org/Curriculum-Instruction-and-Assessment/CTAE/Documents/POS-Information-Technology-Programming.pdf

Programming, Games, Apps, and Society – IT-PGAS (*Georgia Virtual School course)

Are you ready to design and develop? The course is designed for high school students to strategize, design, and develop games and mobile and desktop applications that can be produced in the real world. Students will learn about life-cycles of project development and use models to develop applications. Attention will be placed on how user interfaces affect the usability and effectiveness of a game or an application. Programming constructs will be employed which will allow students’ applications to interact with “real world,” stimuli. The course exposes students to privacy, legality, and security considerations with regards to the software industry.

Various forms of technologies will be used to expose students to resources, software, and applications of programming. Professional communication skills and practices, problem-solving, ethical and legal issues, and the impact of effective presentation skills are enhanced in this course to prepare students to be college and career ready. Employability skills are integrated into activities, tasks, and projects throughout the course standards to demonstrate the skills required by business and industry. Competencies in the co-curricular student organization, Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA), are integral components of the employability skills standard for this course.

Programming, Games, Apps and Society is the third course in the Programming pathway in the Information Technology cluster. Students enrolled in this course should have successfully completed Introduction to Digital Technology and Computer Science Principles. After mastery of the standards in this course, students should be prepared to take the end of pathway assessment in this career area.

Game Design Program

Game Design: Animation and Simulationd Society – IT-GDAS (*Georgia Virtual School course)

Students completing this course will gain an understanding of the fundamental principles used at every stage of the game creation process. First, game genres and modes of play are explored in terms of the psychology of incentives, motivation to play, and social networking. Next, virtual characters and non-player characters are reviewed from concept drawing to 2D and 3D art, rigging, and animation. Next, level design, storytelling, and animation are added to develop a virtual world around the characters. These same techniques are at work in training simulator systems, virtual shopping experiences, augmented reality, and a number of other important career options. Schools offering this program can provide a foundation of traditional drawing, illustration, and art courses to make way for the 2D and 3D animation, storytelling, character development, audio, and game technology.

Students taking this program are strongly encouraged to add an internship to their curriculum which will give them real world experience, understanding how the computer game industry works. Game Design: Animation and Simulation is the third course in the Game Design pathway. Students enrolled in this course should have successfully completed Introduction to Digital Technology and Computer Science Principles. After mastery of the standards in this course, students should be prepared to earn an industry-recognized credential in this career area.

4. EDUCATION AND TRAINING

Early Childhood Education 

     Preschool, kindergarten and elementary school teachers play a vital role in the development of children. They introduce children to math, language, science and social studies. They use games, music, artwork, films, books, computers and other tools to teach basic skills. Teachers design classroom presentations to meet students' needs and abilities. They also work with students individually. They are responsible for planning, evaluating and assigning lesson plans; preparing, administering, grading tests and maintaining discipline.

     Most early childhood education teachers work a 10-month school year with a 2-month vacation during the summer. Many teachers work more than 40 hours a week. Teachers often work with students from varied ethnic, racial and religious backgrounds. With growing minority populations in most parts of the U.S., teachers must work effectively with a diverse student population.

     All 50 states require public school teachers to be licensed, have a bachelor's degree, and have completed an approved teacher training program with a prescribed number of subject and education credits, as well as supervised practice teaching. Teachers must also continually update their skills so they can instruct and use the latest technology in the classroom.

     Most states do not require licensure of teachers in private schools. Licensing requirements for preschool teachers also vary by state. Georgia Pre-K teachers must meet current credential requirements outlined in Georgia's Pre-K Providers' Operating Guidelines and attend annual Pre-K training. Requirements for public preschool teachers are usually more stringent than those for private preschool teachers.

     Most job openings will result from replacing the large number of teachers expected to retire over the next several years. Job prospects should be better in inner cities and rural areas than in suburban districts.

*Related Pathway Occupations:

Education Administrators

Preschool & Childcare Center Instructional Coordinators

Childcare Workers

Pre-School Teachers

Teacher Assistants

Other Related Education & Training Occupations:

School Counselors

Librarians

School Psychologists

Instructors, all subject areas

 

Pathway courses: (sequential)

  1. Early Childhood Education I – ET-ECE
  2. Early Childhood Education II – ET-ECEII
  3. Early Childhood Education Practicum – ET-ECEP

 

Early Childhood Education I – ET-ECE:

The Early Childhood Education I course is the foundational course under the Early Childhood Care & Education pathway and prepares the student for employment in early childhood education and services. The course addresses the knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors associated with supporting and promoting optimal growth and development of infants and children. The pre-requisite for this course is advisor approval.

Early Childhood Education II – ET-ECEII:

Early Childhood Education II is the second course in the Early Childhood Care and Education pathway and further prepares the student for employment in early childhood care and education services. The course provides a history of education, licensing and accreditation requirements, and foundations of basic observation practices and applications. Early childhood care, education, and development issues are also addressed and include health, safety, and nutrition education; certification in CPR/First Aid/Fire Safety; information about child abuse and neglect; symptoms and prevention of major childhood illnesses and diseases; and prevention and control of communicable illnesses. 

Mastery of standards through project based learning, laboratory application, technical skills practice, and leadership development activities of the career and technical student organizations will provide students with a competitive edge for either entry into the education global marketplace and/or the post-secondary institution of their choice when continuing their education and training.

Early Childhood Education Practicum – ET-ECEP:

The practicum offers a candidate in the Early Childhood Education career pathway a field experience under the direct supervision of a certified early childhood educator (mentor). This field experience may be used as partial requirements for the candidate to earn the nationally recognized CDA credential.  The practicum stresses observing, analyzing, and classifying activities of the mentor and comparing personal traits with those of successful early childhood educators. The candidate intern will develop a portfolio of their skills, plan and teach a lesson or lessons, understand and practice confidentiality as it pertains to the teaching profession, meet the needs of students with special needs, maintain the safety of the students, practice professionalism, and demonstrate ethical behavior.

Mastery of standards through project based learning, technical skills practice, and leadership development activities of the career and technical student organization Future Educators of America (FEA) or Family, Career & Community Leaders of America (FCCLA) will provide students with a competitive edge for either entry into the education global marketplace and/or the post-secondary institution of their choice to continue their education and training.

 

Early Childhood Education Program of Study:

http://www.gadoe.org/Curriculum-Instruction-and-Assessment/CTAE/Documents/Education-and-Training-Early-Childhood-Care-Education-II-POS.pdf

 

5. HEALTH SCIENCE

Patient Care

     Careers in the Therapeutic Services pathway are focused primarily on changing the health status of the patient over time. Health professionals in this pathway work directly with patients and may provide care, treatment, counseling and health education information. National labor market information indicates that eight out of the top twenty fastest-growing occupations are in the Health Science industry. (OOH)

    Based on an aging population and a retiring workforce, the demand for health care workers will remain high through 2020. As roles of careers in Therapeutic Services change, professionals in this pathway will find increased opportunities to work independently. Additionally, an increasing number of career opportunities are becoming available outside of the traditional hospital setting.

     Educational levels vary from occupation to occupation. Most Health Science occupations require additional education after high school and require that potential employees acquire the appropriate certification and/or licensing.

     Workers in the Health Science industry must have a solid background in math, science, communications, and technical skills, be knowledgeable in their subject area, have the ability to communicate with others, and inspire trust and confidence.

     Occupations in the Health Sciences represent the largest and fastest-growing industry in the United States employing over 10 million workers in more than 200 careers. Those considering a nursing career should have a strong desire to help others, a genuine concern for the welfare of patients and clients, and an ability to deal with people of diverse backgrounds in stressful situations.

     Rapid job growth is expected in hospital outpatient facilities, such as same-day surgery, rehabilitations, and chemotherapy. Growth is also expected in nursing care facilities and in home health care. RNs with a bachelor's degree will have better job prospects in supervisory and managerial positions than those with either an associate's degree or a diploma. The pay scale will increase as students specialize to nurse practitioner, nurse anesthetist and clinical nurse specialist.

     Students completing the Patient Care pathway have the opportunity to earn a Georgia Certified Nursing Assistant license.

*Related Pathway Occupations:

Certified Nursing Assistants (CNA)

Licensed Practical Nurses (LPN)

Registered Nurses (RN)

Specialized Nursing

Athletic Trainers

Home Health Aides

Anesthesiologist Assistants

Athletic Trainers

Other Related Health Science Occupations:

Medical Assistants

Occupational Therapist /Assistants

Physical Therapist/ Assistants

Physician's Assistants

Recreation Therapists

Respiratory Therapists

Surgical Technicians

 

Pathway courses: (sequential)

  1. Introduction to Healthcare Science – HS-IHS
  2. Essentials of Healthcare – HS-EHS
  3. Patient Care Fundamentals – HS-PCF (CNA licensure exam administered during this course)

 

Introduction to Healthcare Science – HS-IHS:

Introduction to Healthcare Science is the foundational course for all Health Science pathways and is a prerequisite for all other Healthcare Science pathway courses. This course will enable students to receive initial exposure to the many Healthcare Science careers as well as employability, communication, and technology skills necessary in the healthcare industry. The concepts of human growth and development, interaction with patients and family members, health, wellness, and preventative care are evaluated, as well as the legal, ethical responsibilities of today’s healthcare provider. Fundamental healthcare skills development is initiated including microbiology, basic life support and first aid. This course will provide students with a competitive edge to be the better candidate for either entry into the healthcare global marketplace and/or the post-secondary institution of their choice to continue their education and training. The pre-requisite for this course is advisor approval. 

Essentials of Healthcare – HS-EHS:

Anatomy and Physiology is a vital part of most healthcare post-secondary education programs. The Essentials of Healthcare is a medical-focused anatomy course addressing the physiology of each body system, along with the investigation of common diseases, disorders and emerging diseases.  The prevention of disease and the diagnosis and treatment that might be utilized are addressed, along with medical terminology related to each system.  This course provides an opportunity to demonstrate technical skills that enforce the goal of helping students make connections between medical procedures and the pathophysiology of diseases and disorders.  The pre-requisite for this course is Introduction to Healthcare.

Patient Care Fundamentals – HS-PCF:

This course is designed to provide students interested in the careers that involve patient care with entry level skills most commonly associated with the career Nursing Assistant.  The students are required to meet both national and intrastate professional guidelines as designated by applicable regulatory agencies such as the Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA), Center for Disease Control (CDC), and the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) with a specific focus on the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1987 (OBRA) and the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA).  Upon completion of this course and its prerequisites, this course meets the Certified Nurse Assistant curriculum content as specified by the Georgia Medical Care Foundation.  Students meeting all academic, attendance, and age requirements may sit for the Georgia Registry’s Examination.  Successful completion of the Georgia Registry Examination allows students to seek employment in the state of Georgia as a Certified Nurse Assistant.

 

Patient Care Program of Study:

http://www.gadoe.org/Curriculum-Instruction-and-Assessment/CTAE/Documents/Health-Science-Therapeutic-Services-Patient-Care-POS.pdf

Washington Wilkes Comprehensive High School   |   1182 Tignall Rd.   |   Washington, GA 30673
Phone: 706-678-2426   |  Fax: 706-678-2628